Our Weekly Bread: 3 of 36

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This week, my son became the baker in the family by himself. My daughter came to watch and inspect. To clarify, that counts, too. We decided to make another easy bread recipe, Dutch-oven bread. Some people call it no-knead bread. I have blogged about this recipe before here: Dutch-oven bread.

Boy makes bread

Mixing the wet and dry ingredients

My son loved mixing the dough and expressed regret that he was not supposed to knead the bread. I suppose we are gearing up for full-on kneading bread recipes. At least he seems to be eager and ready to do it. Continue reading »


Writing with Ease Review

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Writing with Ease is a writing curriculum for grades 1-4. You can use it with great flexibility. If your child is still learning how to form letters in first grade, you can start Writing with Ease in second grade.

Writing with Ease, level 1

Writing with Ease, level 1

You can get all four volumes, but even the curriculum author will tell you the fourth volume is not necessary. By the time you have gone through the first three volumes, your child will be ready for the Logic Stage. As such, you can move into Writing with Skill. I will cover Writing with Skill in a different post. Continue reading »


Our Weekly Bread: 2 of 36

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On our second week of school, we found 10 minutes on a Thursday to measure some ingredients in the bread pan of our bread machine. I engaged both children this time, and it became clear that this should become a weekly goal.

Honey Banana Wheat Bread

Honey Banana Wheat Bread – fluffy and moorish

The Lord’s Prayer mentions our daily bread, so this will be our weekly bread. To clarify, we still purchase bread from the store, and I still cannot have gluten. But the children can learn to bake bread this school year. One loaf a week seems like a realistic goal. Continue reading »


Our Weekly Bread: 1 of 36

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This school year, we plan to bake one loaf of bread a week. It’s a recent goal, one that happened organically. There are 36 weeks in a school year in the US, so we will have tried 36 different recipes by the end of the school year.

White Bread

Basic white/French bread – a simple recipe with four ingredients

I find weekly goals easier than daily goals, because life happens. No matter how well you plan, there will never be enough planning to eliminate life’s events. But a weekly goal of break making gives us flexibility. Continue reading »



Post No. 835 and the Blog’s 7th Birthday

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HomeschoolWays.com turns seven on August 4, 2020 – that’s tomorrow. This is post no. 835. As we look at these two milestones, we want to do something special for our readers. How about a series of broadcasts on Facebook Live?

Homeschool Pets

Our son is holding Thunder and our daughter is holding Smoky.

We will cover three themes, which summarize the bulk of your preparation to homeschool: the 3 Cs – confidence, connection, curriculum. Without confidence, nobody decides to take the education of her children into her hands. We will highlight ways in which you can build your confidence to homeschool. Continue reading »


Ready, Set, Go!

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We start the new school year next week. I know. It’s early. Two weeks earlier than our local public school district. There are many reasons why we start now.

Hydrangeas

Enjoy summer and hydrangeas while they last.

First, we need 30 weeks of instruction until the nationally standardized test they take in March of 2021. I add Christmas break, Thanksgiving break, sick days, and count back to a date in early August. Continue reading »


More Book Ideas

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We borrowed more books from our library, to continue our quest to finish the Great Words, Great Works book list put together by the National Spelling Bee. Anna Porter Public Library in Gatlinburg, TN may be small, but it is mighty. When they do not have a title, they will get it for us through ILL.

Selections from Great Words, Great Works

Selections from Great Words, Great Works

I have learned to send about five title requests, especially if we are talking chapter books. Picture books require 20 minutes to read. A chapter book written for a third grader can have 188 pages. They may be small pages with seven pages of illustrations total, for instance, but it will still take about three or four hours to read out loud. If you have to take these books back in 14 days with no renewal possible, then you have to really hurry up. Continue reading »


Paddle-to-the-Sea

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Paddle-to-the-Sea by Holling Clancy Holling is a classic children’s book about the region of the Great Lakes between Canada and the USA. If you are looking to learn social studies through literature, this book should join your list.

Paddle-to-the-Sea

Paddle-to-the-Sea is a children’s classic about the Great Lakes.

Through this book, the kids and I have learned how to memorize the names and the shapes of the Great Lakes, for instance. We also learned new vocabulary (e.g. Davy Jones’ locker, the Soo) and more about the geography of the border between Canada and the USA. Continue reading »